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UK's Craig Carter assumes national leadership role

 

University of Kentucky

LEXINGTON, Ky. - Craig N. Carter, director and professor of epidemiology at the University of Kentucky Veterinary Diagnostic Laboratory (UKVDL), recently took the helm of the American Veterinary Epidemiology Society (AVES) as president for a five-year term.

AVES was founded by James H. Steele in 1964 to recognize global leaders in infectious disease epidemiology and public health and to foster research to combat infectious diseases in both animals and humans. The society has recognized more than 70 world-renowned scientists through awarding the K.F. Meyer/James H. Steele Gold Headed Cane Award, which Carter received in 2011, primarily for his work on zoonotic diseases.

“I consider it such a great honor and privilege to serve as the president of the American Veterinary Epidemiology Society for the next five years," said Carter. "Since leaving my ambulatory practice in Texas, I have worked as an epidemiologist in service, research and teaching roles in the university, military and international consulting environments for over thirty years. Dr. Jim Steele — founder of the AVES and the CDC division of epidemiology — was my graduate professor, mentor and dear friend for many years until his death at 100 years young in 2013."

Carter was recruited from Texas A&M University to the UK College of Agriculture, Food, and Environment in 2005 to build an epidemiology program to provide for the early detection of animal disease outbreaks such as Mare Reproductive Loss Syndrome. In 2007, he was appointed to his current position at UKVDL where he oversees lab operations, conducts research and works with his graduate students.

One of Carter’s goals for the AVES is to attract more bright students into careers in epidemiology. Sponsored by Hartz Mountain Corporation, the AVES hosts its annual meeting each year as part of the American Veterinary Medical Association (AVMA) meeting. The 2016 meeting will be held in July, in San Antonio, Texas. A celebration of the 100th anniversary of the U.S. Army Veterinary Corps will also be held at Fort Sam Houston in San Antonio in conjunction with the AVMA meeting. Carter’s military career spanned from 1967-2008, retiring as a full colonel in the U.S. Army Reserve Veterinary Corps.

Carter said he has thoroughly enjoyed his many years as a faculty member at UK.

"Now nearing the end of my career, I delight in this opportunity to give something back to the AVES and to a scientific discipline that has been so good to me and the world.”