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Equine Infectious Diseases and Emergency Response

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Equine Disease Communication Center

Current Equine Disease Alerts/Investigations

Kentucky EHV-1 Investigations

No Active Current Investigations

Turfway Park EHV - Resolved

Turfway Park Resolved - Updated 2/10/2017

Results of testing from the population of horses in the quarantined barn have been reported, and with it having been greater than 14 days since the population was last exposed, the quarantine is released and horses in the barn are under no further restrictions.

With this barn now released, there are no racing or training facilities in KY under quarantine for EHV1.

Previously positive horses do remain under regulatory monitoring and remain quarantined in secured isolated areas.  

We appreciate the commitment, and cooperation of KY’s horsemen, track managers, racing officials and all others who worked to resolve these events.

Update 2/10/17 at 11:15am

Keeneland’s barn on Rice Road that has remained under quarantine, is today released from the quarantine and all associated restrictions.

Testing of this barn’s population of horses that had been exposed to EHV1 was completed today (2/10/2017) with each horse testing NEG on both nasal swabs and whole blood.  Having been greater than 14 days post exposure and each horse now having two (2) negative sets of results – The KY Office of State Veterinarian has released the quarantine imposed on January 22, 2017 and horses from this barn are under no further restrictions.  With this release, we have no barns at the training center under quarantine or restriction.  Previous positive horses do remain under regulatory monitoring and are quarantined at a secured segregated area off the site and will remain so until they too are confirmed negative by PCR testing.

Updated 2/8/17 - Turfway Park

Results of EHV1 testing by PCR, conducted on the population of horses in the quarantined barn at Turfway Park has failed to give us the level of confidence needed tonight to declare that the horses in the barn meet eligibility to be released from the quarantine and restrictions.  With this determination, the status of this barn remains unchanged tonight.

In summary: With one (1) exception, the population of horses in the barn did test negative on both whole blood and nasal swabs. The single exception is a result from a nasal swab that did detect EHV1 DNA at a low level.  The whole blood sample was negative, and daily monitoring has been conducted with no evidence of illness detected.  To assure confidence of this individual’s (and the population’s) status, additional samples (whole blood and nasal swabs) are scheduled to be collected from this horse.  Results of this sampling are expected to be available on Friday afternoon 2/10/17.

KEENELAND'S Rice Road Training Center – 1 barn remains under quarantine tonight – Samples (whole blood and nasal swabs) have been collected from the horses in this barn and testing results are expected to be available tomorrow morning 2/9/17.  We will issue an update on the status of horses in this barn after the results are reported.

KEENELAND'S Rice Road Training Center - 1 of 2 barns that had been quarantined earlier, has today been released from the quarantine and all associated restrictions.

Testing of the barn’s population of horses that had been exposed to EHV1 was completed today (2/8/2017) with each horse testing NEG on both nasal swabs and whole blood.  Having been greater than 14 days post exposure and each horse now having two (2) negative sets of results – The KY Office of State Veterinarian has released the quarantine imposed on January 22, 2017 and horses from this barn are under no further restrictions.

Updated 2/3/17

OLDHAM COUNTY PREMISES II = Quarantine Released

Testing of the barn’s population of horses that had been exposed to EHV1has been completed with the results reported yesterday earlier today (2/3/2017) that each horse tested NEG on both nasal swabs and whole blood.  Having been greater than 14 days post exposure with daily observation and monitoring for illness conducted with no abnormal finding, and each horse now having two (2) negative sets of results – The Ky Office of State Veterinarian has released the quarantine imposed on January 11, 2017 and the horses are under no further restrictions.

KEENELAND's Rice Road Training Center and TURFWAY Park in Florence KY

The investigations and status at each of these facilities is unchanged since the previous reports.

The population of horses continues to be monitored daily. Sample collection and testing of these barns populations is being scheduled and planned for next week

Updated 1/26/17

KEENELAND – Rice Road Training Center

Testing of samples collected on 1/25/17 from horses in both barns has been completed and reported. The testing did identify a second positive horse in the first barn, bringing the total EHV1 ‘wild strain’ positive horses in that barn to two (2). That horse, a 3yo TB colt was positive on nasal swab, negative on blood. The colt was moved from the barn to the secured isolation last night (Wed 1/25).

Testing of horses in the second barn did identify three (3) horses, all are 2yo TB fillies, to be EHV1 ‘wild strain’ positive by PCR on the nasal swabs, testing of whole blood samples from each horse were reported negative for EHV1.  These additional positive horses were moved from the barn to the secured isolation earlier tonight.

Each of the two quarantined barns are secured, entry into the barns is restricted and biosecurity levels are implemented at highest level.  In addition to the affected barns, heightened biosecurity has been implemented in the entire barn area that includes restricting entrance into each barn, and requires disinfecting upon entry and exit of each barn.

Designated times have been established for the horses from the quarantined barns to gain access to the track for exercise after the normal training hours have elapsed and the general population of horses have returned to their barns.

TURFWAY PARK The two positive horses identified and described on 1/24/17 were moved offsite and are isolated on a private farm. Monitoring of the general population continues with no evidence of further cases developing. The previously established and described protocols for ship-ins, racing, training and monitoring remain in effect.

Oldham Premises I Testing of the barn’s population of horses that had been exposed to EHV1 was completed yesterday (1/25/2017) with each horse testing NEG on both nasal swabs and whole blood.  Having been greater than 14 days post exposure, and each horse now having two (2) negative sets of results – The Ky Office of State Veterinarian has released the quarantine imposed on January 5, 2017 and the horses are under no further restrictions.

Oldham Premises II Daily monitoring and assessment of the horses in the exposed quarantine barn continues with no evidence of further transmission of EHV1.  Collection of samples (swabs and blood) from these horses has been scheduled to be completed next week to determine their eligibility to be released from restrictions as well.

Updated 1/24/17

TURFWAY PARK

The sampling of horses in the affected barn at Turfway Park did identify two (2)  additional horses (from 1 trainer a 4yo TB gelding and a 9yo TB mare) to be EHV-1 Positive by PCR detecting the ‘wild strain’ of virus from nasal swabs.  There have been no clinical developments in the horses currently housed in Barn 27 and options for removing those two positive horses from the environment and managing the barns remaining population are being evaluated and considered tonight.

KEENELAND

Whole blood samples were submitted from the population of horses in both of the previously quarantined barns today, and testing completed earlier this evening has identified a single positive EHV-1 horse (3yo TB colt) in one barn. That positive horse has been removed from the barn and is in a secured isolation.  Testing of nasal swabs collected from each horse in the barn is expected to be completed tomorrow.  The population of horses continues to be confined to the barn pending results of that testing.  Testing of samples completed on horses in the second quarantined barn have been reported negative on blood only and they too remain confined to the barn until testing of nasal swabs is complete.

The barns are secure with movement into and out of the barns restricted to essential personnel only. Biosecurity measures have and continue to be implemented at the highest level at each track and we are of the opinion tonight that recognizing and responding to the disease risk early in this united manner has been effective at both tracks and does provide the opportunity to resolve the disease threat in the coming weeks. Updates will be provided by the Kentucky Office of State Veterinarian as new information becomes available or developments occur.

Updated 1/23/17 @ 8:00am

No new clinical developments or significant events over the weekend. Samples collected from each horse in affected barn at Turfway Park  on 1/22/17 were submitted for testing today as

UPDATE 1/21/17 @ 5:00pm

Samples collected from each horse in affected barn

The Kentucky Office of State Veterinarian has placed an order of quarantine on a barn on the backside of Turfway Park after a horse from that barn was tested by a PCR assay and determined to be positive to Equine Herpesvirus Type-1 ‘wild strain.’ The horse, a 2014 Thoroughbred filly, had been stabled in the barn at Turfway from October 30 through January 19, 2017. The sample, a nasal swab, was collected as the filly was being moved to a private facility to prepare for breeding in 2017. The filly is currently in isolation offsite on a private farm.

In response to the report of a positive result, the Office of the State Veterinarian did issue a directive on Friday, January 20, that horses in the affected barn are confined to the barn and an order of quarantine issued on Saturday morning. Security is in place, with only essential personnel granted access to the barn and caution being taken on exit to ensure sanitation. Results of testing are expected to be available Monday evening, January 23.  In the interim, horses are confined to the barn. After the risk is better defined, the Office will develop schedules to allow eligible horses in the barn to work on the track outside normal training hours after all other horses have returned to their barns.

Rusty Ford, equine programs manager for Kentucky State Veterinarian Robert Stout, was on the grounds Saturday morning, January 21. Meeting with trainers in the quarantined barn, track management, attending veterinarians and racing officials, Ford stated, “Because proactive measures were implemented at Turfway Park earlier in the meet, including restricted access and controlled movement of horses onto the backside and the elevated biosecurity implemented in all common areas, we are optimistic our efforts will pay a dividend and that we have minimized risk of disease transmission on the backside.”

After reviewing movement records of horses in and out of Turfway, we also have preliminarily identified a potential point of exposure involving two barns at the Keeneland training center. Each of those barns also has been placed under quarantine, and arrangements are being made to sample those horses. As at Turfway, in the interim horses in those barns are restricted to their barn areas and not permitted to train. As our epidemiology investigation continues, we will be better able to define what direct and indirect exposure may have occurred and adjust our strategies as needed.

As in the past, Kentucky horsemen, tracks and racing officials recognize and appreciate efforts made to control disease transmission and accept the short term inconvenience and associated cost for the long term benefit of racing in the Commonwealth.

Updated 1/19/17 @ 3:45pm

There is apparently ‘misinformation’ circulating through social media and other channels relative to the EHV-1 investigations underway in KY. Strategically, our situation here in Kentucky is unchanged – we are continuing to investigate and manage two (2) disease instances – on separate premises.  The investigations, both involving premises in Oldham County, are unrelated with one involving the ‘wild strain’ of EHV-1 and the second associated with the mutated strain of EHV-1.  Details of each investigation/status were previously made on 1/13/17 and there has been no significant new developments.

Update 1/19/17:

The investigation and status on Premises 1 is unchanged – there have been no additional cases develop, daily monitoring and evaluation continues.

The investigation and status on Premises 2 – we continue to have one barn on premises 2 under quarantine.  Daily monitoring and evaluation of all other barns on the premises continues to provide evidence that our strategies utilized thus far have been effective in containing the virus to the original index barn. There is no evidence indicating or suggesting the virus has spread on the premises.

Current Racing in KY:  Live racing continues at Turfway Park in Northern Kentucky with disease mitigating strategies being effectively utilized. These strategies include control and oversight by the KY Department of Agriculture of horses moving onto and off the track, restrict racing ship-ins to the receiving barn, as well as elevating our daily biosecurity practices to include enhanced race day cleaning/disinfecting of common areas and equipment, that includes starting gate between races, receiving barn, test barn, etc.  We appreciate the sacrifice made by horsemen, track management, veterinarians, Turfway Park’s security officers and the backside ground crew.

Fair Grounds: Published reports indicate quarantines currently in place at Fair Grounds Race Course in New Orleans may begin being released later this week.  Our position today, that disallows horses from those areas to gain entry to a KY track or sanctioned training facility is unchanged from the directive issued on January 3, 2017.  We will continue to evaluate the current disease status in LA, and will adjust our strategies as facts become more clear and understandable.

Equine updates available at: www.kyagr.com/statevet/equine-infectious-diseases.html

Updated 1/13/2017

FIRST: For clarification – I am again restating that we are currently working 2 separate incidences here in KY where EHV-1 has been diagnosed.  Each of the 2 involved premises are in Oldham County Kentucky and for the purpose of reporting are identified Oldham Premise 1 and Oldham Premise 2.  When reviewing the information it is important to distinguish the two separate investigations and premises, as they are not related and in fact two different strains of EHV-1 have been determined.

Premises 1: I initially reported this case to EDCC on 1/7/17 with details described.  The causative agent in this investigation was determined to be EHV1 mutated strain (ORF30 gene).

As of today, 1/13/2017 there have been no additional cases found since the last cases diagnosed on 1/6.

Daily monitoring continues and the reports show no significant findings.  There have been 4 horses on Premises 1 identified as positive, and in all cases the mutated strain of virus was identified.

Traces from Premises 1 were conducted and did result in 2 additional horses being identified as positive. Each of these horses are on private facilities.  Both of the positive horses and their cohorts remain isolated and monitoring continues.

Premises 2: I initially reported to EDCC on 1/11/17 with details described in the notification.  Included in the report was information that samples (both nasal swabs and whole blood) were collected from each horse in the affected barn on Premises 2 and submitted for EHV testing.  Results of that testing did identify 5 additional horses to be positive by PCR on the nasal swab.  As was the first case in this investigation, the strain of EHV1 identified is the ‘wild strain’, not the mutated strain.  Testing of the each blood sample was reported NEG by PCR.  These results provide evidence that virus has (and was continuing on 1/11) to be circulating in the barn that had been placed under quarantine.  The 5 positive horses were removed from the barn and placed in a separate isolation early this morning (1/13/17).  Monitoring of horses in the other barns continues, and there has been no evidence discovered suggesting the virus has spread to other barns or areas on the premises.  Health monitoring of the population continues and individual reports assessed daily.

KY’s Racing Safeguard is ENHANCED BIOSECURITY: Currently live racing is being conducted at Turfway Park in Florence KY.  Disease mitigating strategies have been implemented at the track to help maintain a safe and healthy environment.  The strategies include control and oversight of horse movement onto and off the track, restrict racing ship-ins to the receiving barn, in addition to elevating our daily biosecurity practices to include enhanced race day cleaning/disinfecting of common areas and equipment to include starting gates, receiving barn, test barn, etc.  While somewhat disruptive to ‘business as usual’, these added safeguards are our best opportunity to maintain a healthy environment for horses to come and race.  We appreciate the sacrifice made by horsemen, track management, veterinarians, security and the backside ground crew.

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Kentucky EHV-1 Investigations - Update

Kentucky EHV-1 Investigation Summaries - (No Active Cases)

See reports sent to the Equine Disease Communication Center:1/12/2017 @ 10:45pm

First: From the information provided 1/7/17 –some reporting incorrectly interpreted the information provided and suggested the outbreak of Equine Herpesviurs Type 1 currently being investigated was associated to a veterinary hospital. There is not nor has there been any veterinary facility quarantined for equine herpesvirus in KY.

Update: A horse residing on a second premises in Oldham County tested positive for EHV1 (wild strain), following development of a fever on 1/9.  There have been no neurologic abnormalities seen.  We did earlier today visit the premises and after assessing the facility layout and operation, the barn where this horse resided was placed under an order of quarantine.

Horses in all barns on the premises are being monitored daily with temperature logs kept and provided to our office. KDA has and will continue to have personnel on the grounds monitoring activity.

Samples (nasal swabs and whole blood) were collected from each horse residing in the affected barn and those samples were submitted to the laboratory tonight for EHV testing.  Although both premises  currently under quarantine are in Oldham County, they are different strains of the virus involved. There is no evidence that the cases are related.

The affected horse on the second premises was moved to an isolation barn when fever was found and he was moved off the premises on 1/12/17..

Update to the first affected premises.  Results of the testing on side 1 did identify two additional horses positive to EHV1 having the mutated ORF30 gene.  In addition, the horse on side 2 that had spiked a fever late last week, tested positive to the same virus strain.  All three of these horses were moved from their stabling area and placed in the isolation unit and the population of horses on side 2 were sampled with no additional positives discovered.  Subsequently, the horse from side 2 that had fever presented with neurological abnormalities on Monday and was moved to isolation at a veterinary hospital for treatment where it continues to improve.

Results of Tracing From Premises One: All horses that had left the facility have been located and testing completed. 2 horses that had moved were identified to be positive (ORF30 mutated gene). These horses are in isolation on private facilities and are being monitored with the established protocol being followed.

Kentucky EHV-1 Investigations updated 1/8/2017

See Full report sent to the Equine Disease Communication Center:       1/7/2017 @ 3:22pm

On 1/4/17 a  2yo filly was referred from a Northern KY privately operated premises (Oldham Co) to a Lexington area hospital for evaluation

On 1/5 the KY Dept Agr’s investigator met with the premises’ management and the attending veterinarians – 14 horses in the ‘affected’ wing of the barn were sampled (nasal swab and whole blood)

On 1/6 am we were advised a horse in the barn’s second wing had a fever = samples were collected and hand submitted to the laboratory. 

On 1/6 pm – Laboratory reported 2 of the 14 horses sampled from Side 1 were positive, and the febrile horse on Side 2 was also positive.
Each of the three positive results identified the ORF30 gene.

Samples are scheduled to be collected from the remaining 18 horses on Monday 1/9 am (Accounts for all horses on premises).

Equine that had moved from the premises since mid-December have been traced, located and are being individually assessed and when beneficial tested following our defined protocol.

There has been no movement to any KY racing/training facility.

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Equine Disease Outbreaks and Emergency Responses

As would be expected, the Kentucky Department of Agriculture is a leader among other states when situations occur which threaten the equine industry. Because of this leadership role, it is our responsibility to react promptly and with competence to threatening situations. We maintain an active advisory committee to assist the State Veterinarian and the Board of Agriculture in making informed decisions. This committee is comprised of some of the Nation's most respected practicing veterinarian's, researchers, scientist and industry leaders. As has been demonstrated numerous times during the past few years the Kentucky Department of Agriculture is capable of developing and implementing emergency programs and, when necessary promulgating emergency regulations, which have proven to be most effective in protecting Kentucky's vast equine population from threatening diseases. Because of the economic significance Kentucky's equine industry has in the State, we have over the years developed systematic means that enable us to accurately monitor disease situations in other states and countries. Information regarding threatening situations is gathered in a timely manner, reviewed and when warranted disseminated to Kentucky's equine industry and practicing veterinarians. The Kentucky Department of Agriculture works closely with the Kentucky Association of Equine Practitioners and the Kentucky Veterinary Medical Association to insure that our practicing veterinarians are apprised of all threatening situations.

    EXAMPLES OF PAST EMERGENCY PROGRAMS
  • Illinois Eva Outbreak At Arlington Race Track
  • Australia Morbillivirus
  • Vesicular Stomatitis In The Western States
  • 1998 CEM Like Organism Found In The Nurse Mare Population
  • 1999 - 2001 Monitoring West Nile Virus Occurrence
  • 2001 - Foot and Mouth Disease Surveillance
  • 2001 - Mare Reproductive Loss Syndrome in Kentucky
Past Responses: 2011 Outbreak Overview

2011 ARKANSAS EQUINE INFECTIOUS ANEMIA (EIA) OUTBREAK

EQUINE HERPES MYELOENCEPHALOPATHY (EHM)2011 WESTERN STATES OUTBREAK OVERVIEW

Click for outbreak map

Equine Herpesvirus Myeloencephalopathy (EHM) & EHV-1 Resources

USDA Incident Information - Includes Weekly Situation Reports showing suspect and confirmed cases by states and other USDA Information.

Frequently Asked Questions about EHV/EHM for Horse Owners from American Association of Equine Practitioners

EHV/EHM Brochure for Horse Owners USDA 2009 Publication

KENTUCKY DEPT AGR UPDATE : 6 June 2011
The Kentucky Department of Agriculture has recieved the final report on this outbreak.  No new cases and no new premises have been affected.

    KENTUCKY DEPT AGR UPDATE : 6 June 2011
    Key Information - TOTALS:
  • 52 Confirmed EHV-1 Cases (32 primary exposure which occurred at show in Ogden, UT + 20 secondary or tertiary exposure*)
  • 32 Confirmed EHM Cases (26 primary exposure which occurred at show in Ogden, UT + 6 secondary or tertiary exposure*)
  • 12 Deaths attributed to EHV/EHM Outbreak - Not all cases confirmed.

Horses categorized in EHV-1 or EHM suspect categories or as EHV-1confirmed in previous reports may change categories based on test results or development of additional clinical signs. *secondary or tertiary horses are those which have been exposed to horses which were exposed at the Ogden, UT show.

    KENTUCKY DEPT AGR UPDATE : 31 May 2011
    Key Information - TOTALS:
  • 47 Confirmed EHV-1 Cases (33 primary exposure which occurred at show in Ogden, UT + 14 secondary or tertiary exposure*)
  • 28 Confirmed EHM Cases (25 primary exposure which occurred at show in Ogden, UT + 3 secondary or tertiary exposure*)
  • 11 Deaths attributed to EHV/EHM Outbreak - Not all cases confirmed. Click here for map of confirmed deaths.

*secondary or tertiary horses are those which have been exposed to horses which were exposed at the Ogden, UT show.

KENTUCKY DEPT AGR UPDATE : 23 May 2011

2011 EQUINE HERPES MYELOENCEPHALOPATHY (EHM) WESTERN STATES OUTBREAK : KENTUCKY PESPECTIVE 23 May 2011

KENTUCKY DEPT AGR UPDATE : 18 May 2011

2011 EQUINE HERPES MYELOENCEPHALOPATHY (EHM) WESTERN STATES OUTBREAK : KENTUCKY PESPECTIVE 18 May 2011

KENTUCKY DEPT AGR UPDATE : 16 May 2011 Equine Herpes Myeloencephalopathy Outbreak - Rusty Ford
The Kentucky Department of Agriculture has received reports of Equine Herpes Myeloencephalopathy (EHV-1) affecting horses in multiple western states and have verified the disease being diagnosed in Colorado.  The outbreak reportedly traces to horses thatattended the National Cutting Horse Association's (NCHA) Western National Championships in Ogden, Utah. The event took place April 30 ? May 8, 2011. Horses from multiple states were at the event.

After contacting the NCHA and the KY Quarter Horse Association we have found no evidence that Kentucky horses were present at this event nor has there been anyindication of Kentucky horses being affected. In light of this recent disease outbreak, theKentucky State Veterinarians Office encourages exhibitors to take extra caution to protect their horses from EHV-1 and other communicable disease.

  • Consult your veterinarian about potential disease threats and steps you can take to mitigate any identified threat.?
  • Available vaccines make no label claim to prevent the myeloencephalitic form of EHV-1 infection. Consult your veterinarian about any potential benefit vaccinating horses against equine herpes myeloencephalogathy (EHV-1). Recentexperiences combating outbreaks of neurologic herpes caused by EHV-1 in Kentuckysupports theanecdotal evidence suggesting some efficacyminimizing the impact of the disease.
  • Observe horses daily for evidence of illness that may include elevated body temperature.
  • Prevent your horses from having unnecessary contact with other horses at shows: do not allow them to drink from a common water source or eat from shared buckets, minimize sharing of equipment such as lead lines, and disinfect any equipment that is shared.?

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2017 West Nile Virus - Equine Case Summary

2017 KY's Equine West Nile Virus - Updated 8/1/2017
3   Case(s) Reported - Map of affected counties

Animal's Disposition:
2 - Survived / 1 - Euthanized

Animal's West Nile Vaccination Status:
2 Not Vaccinated

1 - Vaccination is reported as 'Current'

Affected Counties: Equine in 03 of Kentucky's 120 Counties

Bourbon (1), Franklin (1), Menifee (1)
=====================================================
2016 KY's Equine West Nile Virus
- Summary
7   Case(s) Reported - Map of affected counties

Animal's Disposition:
7 - Survived / 0 - Euthanized

Animal's West Nile Vaccination Status:
7 Not Vaccinated

Affected Counties: Equine in 7 of Kentucky's 120 Counties

Barren (1), Bourbon (1), Hart (1), Hardin (1)
Logan (1), Powell (1), Union (1)

=====================================================

 

Scroll Down for Annual Summary Reports and Geographic Maps



Eastern Equine Encephalitis is infrequently diagnosed in Kentucky equine.

The last reported cases of EEE affecting horses in Kentucky occured in 2013 (a 10yo, TWH, Non-Vaccinated gelding in Logan County and a second case occured in a 17yo QH mare in Carlisle County), Both horses had no known vaccinationin history and each animal expired.  Prior to these cases, the most recent  diagnosis was in 2008 (6mo Paint filly, Non-Vaccinated), and in 1995 (an 8yr female, Western KY, Not-Vaccinated)
The American Association of Equine Practitioners web page includes information describing this disease and it can be found at http://www.aaep.org/eee_wee.htm.
SURVEILLANCE:The Departments of Agriculture and Public Health have included Eastern equine encephalitis in our arbovirus surveillance. Mosquitoes being screened for West Nile virus are also tested for Eastern equine encephalitis virus. In addition, equine suspected of having contracted an encephalitic condition are being tested for West Nile and when warranted the sample is forwarded to the National Veterinary Services Laboratory for EEE screening.

West Nile Cummulative Summary and Annual Data/Maps

West Nile Virus 2001-2016 Cumulative WNv Analysis

  • 728 Confirmed Equine West Nile Cases
  • 96.14% (699) Not Adequately Vaccinated*
  • 30.12% (219) Case Mortality Rate**

    *Not-vaccinated during 12mo period preceding onset
    or received only initial vaccination (no booster)
    **Confirmed by Case Definition

 

 

West Nile Virus - 2016 Equine  7 Case(s) Reported on 7 Premises

0 Eastern Encephalitis Cases

  • Animal's Disoposition: 7 - Survived / 0 - Euthanized
  • Animal's West Nile Vaccination Status: 7 Not Vaccinated
    Affected Equine in 7 of Kentucky's 120 Counties: Barren (1), Bourbon (1), Hart (1), Hardin (1), Logan (1), Powell (1), Union (1)

 

West Nile Virus - 2015 Equine 8 Equine Confirmed West Nile Cases on 8 Premises

0 Eastern Encephalitis Cases

  • Animal's Disposition - 8 Alive / 0 Euthanized
  • Animal's West Nile Vaccination Status - 7 Non-Vaccinated+ 1 Unlikely Vacc
    Affected Equine in 7 of Kentucky's 120 Counties: Bourbon (1), Crittenden (1),
    Fayette (1), Jefferson (1), Montgomery (1), Nelson (2), Shelby (1)

 


Onset Week

Trend - Week Diagnosis ConfirmedClose this window
Equine West Nile Virus Summary Maps
2001 West Nile
  • 8 Confirmed Equine West Nile Cases
  • 0% (8) Vaccinated
  • 75% (6) Mortality Rate of Affected Equine
2002 West Nile
  • 513 Confirmed Equine West Nile Cases
  • 97% (496) Not Vaccinated within previous 12 months
  • 27% (137) Mortality Rate of Affected Equine
2003 West Nile
  • 102 Confirmed Equine West Nile Cases
  • 94% (96) Not Vaccinated within previous 12 months
  • 34% (35) Mortality Rate of Affected Equine
2004 West Nile
  • 8 Confirmed Equine West Nile Cases
  • 100% (8) Not Vaccinated within previous 12 months
  • 50% (4) Mortality Rate of Affected Equine
2005 West Nile
  • 9 Confirmed Equine West Nile Cases
  • 100% (9)Not Vaccinated within previous 12 months
  • 33% (3) Mortality Rate of Affected Equine
2006 West Nile
  • 18 Confirmed Equine West Nile Cases
  • 100% (18) Not Vaccinated within previous 12 months
  • 44% (8) Mortality Rate of Affected Equine
2007 West Nile
  • 6 Confirmed Equine West Nile Cases
  • 100% (6) Not Vaccinated within previous 12 months
  • 33% (2) Mortality Rate of Affected Equine
2008 Equine Cases
  • 5 Equine West Nile
  • 80% (4) Not Vaccianated within Previous 12 months
  • 20% (1) Vaccination Status Unknown
  • 0% Mortality
  • 1 EEE Confirmed - Not Vaccinated* -
    Deceased *Vaccinated EEE ~72hrs
    prior to onset
2009 Equine West Nile Cases
  • 8 Confirmed Equine West Nile Cases
  • 87.5% (7)Not Vaccinated within previous 12 months
  • 12.5% (1) Vaccination Status Unknown
  • 12.5% Mortality Rate of Affected Equine
2010 Equine WNV
  • 6 Confirmed Equine West Nile Cases
  • 100% (6) Not Vaccinated within previous 12 months
  • 50% (3) Mortality Rate of Affected Equine
2011 Equine WNV Map
  • 1 Confirmed Equine West Nile Case
  • 100% (1) Not Vaccinated within previous 12 mo
  • 0.0% Mortality Rate of Affected Equine

2012 West Nile Virus

  • 13 Confirmed Equine West Nile Cases
  • 9 Not Vaccinated, 3 Partially Vaccinated, 1 Reportedly Vaccinated
  • 54% Mortality Rate of Affected Equine

2013 Equine West Nile and EEE Map

12 Confirmed Equine West Nile Cases

100% (12) Not Vaccinated within previous 12mo
83% (10) Mortality Rate of Affected Equine

Note: 2 EEE , Not Vacc, Both Expired

2014 Equine West Nile

  • 4 Confirmed Equine West Nile Cases
  • 75% (3) Not Vaccinated within previous 12 months (1 Unknown Status)
  • 75% (4) Mortality Rate of Affected Equine

 

2015 Equine West Nile Cases

  • 8 Equine Confirmed West Nile Cases
  • 100% (7) Not Vacc within previous 12mo and (1) not thought to be vacc
  • 0% (0) Mortality Rate of Affected Equine

2016 WNV Map

  • 7 Confirmed Equine West Nile Cases
  • 100% (7) Not Vaccinated within previous 12 months
  • 0% (0) Mortality Rate of Affected Equine
  • 2001-2016 Cumulative WNv Analysis
  • 728 Confirmed Equine West Nile Cases
  • 96.14% (699) Not Adequately Vaccinated*
  • 30.12% (219) Case Mortality Rate**

    *Not-vaccinated during 12mo period preceding onset
    or received only initial vaccination (no booster)
    **Confirmed by Case Definition
Click for a closer look at Equine West Nile Virus (Annual Summaries and Maps)

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Equine Infectious Anemia

September 11, 2015

Kentucky Reports Four Horses in Marshall County to be EIA Positive

 

The Kentucky Department of Agriculture (KDA) is reporting today that during the past two weeks, four (4) horses in Western Kentucky’s Marshall County have tested positive for detection of equine infectious anemia (EIA).  These are the first Kentucky horses found positive for the viral disease since 2007. The initial horse was found positive as a result of testing performed by a private veterinarian, with the remaining three (3) cases discovered through testing conducted as part of the KDA investigation. Each of the horses were confirmed positive by additional testing and have since been humanely destroyed and buried. Seven (7) additional ‘cohorts’ tested negative on the initial testing.  These seven remain under quarantine and will be periodically sampled during the next 60 days.

 

Though the route of transmission cannot be definitively determined, iatronic transmission has not been ruled out.  The fact that one group of seven horses were commingled in a confined location the past 10 months with no evidence of transmission, minimizes chance of natural transmission having occurred.

 

The horses testing positive are described to be pleasure riding horses that have resided on one of two farms for several years and range in age from six to twenty-one years of age. When the positive horses were evaluated by KDA, they were found to be asymptomatic and in good body condition. The older horses were all reported to have been purchased through livestock markets, and as such would have been tested negative at the time of purchase.  These pleasure horses have not regularly participated in practices that required they be routinely tested, and are defined as representing the ‘untested population’.

 

More information about Kentucky’s EIA Surveillance and Control Program that includes annual testing stats can be found at www.kyagr.com/statevet/equine-infectious-diseases.html.

 

The Kentucky Department of Agriculture will provide updates as new information becomes available.


Equine Infectious Anemia (EIA) is an infectious viral disease affecting members of the horse family - for more information on this disease, please refer to the USDA EIA FACTSHEET.

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History and Guidelines of Program
In 1974 the Kentucky Department of Agriculture implemented a program to determine the occurrence of Equine Infectious Anemia (EIA) among Kentucky's equine population. Testing conducted during the late 1970's and into the 1980's annually identified between 120 and 150 animals as affected with EIA.During the mid 80's and throughout the 90's an increased amount of attention was placed on stopping the spread of EIA amongst Kentucky's equine population. Today in excess of 100,000 samples are tested annually with fewer than 5 animals being identified as affected with EIA. Late in 2002 the Kentucky Department of Agriculture for the first time since its' inception amended the EIA Testing requirement from six (6) months to twelve (12) months for equine being offered for sale or changing ownership. FOR THE PURPOSE OF MEETING STATE TESTING REQUIREMENTS THE KENTUCKY DEPARTMENT OF AGRICULTURE REQUIRES THAT THE ANIMALS BE TESTED USING AN OFFICIAL TEST METHOD CONDUCTED BY A LABORATORY APPROVED BY THE USDA TO CONDUCT EIA TESTING.

Official Tests
The Kentucky State Board of Agriculture recognizes both the agar gel immunodiffusion (AGID) and the ELISA as official tests. When time permits, we encourage the use of the AGID test. Though not often, we have on occasion seen instances of "false positives" being reported when using the ELISA test. In addition the ELISA tests are not always recognized by some states as "official" and are not recognized as "official" tests for the purpose of exporting animals from the United States. In the event that an ELISA test is used for the interstate movement of an animal, we would encourage you to contact the state of destination to insure that the test is recognized.

Sale and Exhibition
(1) Sale. All horses and other equidae, except un-weaned foals accompanied by their dam, offered for sale, traded, given away, leased, or moved for the purpose of change of ownership shall be negative to an AGID test or other USDA approved test for equine infectious anemia within the previous twelve (12) months. Equine which are offered for sale at approved auction markets without proof of a negative test for EIA within the previous twelve (12) months shall have a blood sample drawn at the market by the approved market veterinarian at the seller's expense.

(2) Exhibition. All horses and other equidae, except un-weaned foals accompanied by their dam, offered for exhibition (i.e., entry into fairgrounds, livestock show grounds, public boarding stables, trail rides, racing, etc.) shall be negative to an AGID test or other USDA approved test for equine infectious anemia within the previous twelve (12) months.

Kentucky Annual Testing Statistics
Annual EIA Testing In KY Testing Trends
YEAR No Test POS ANIMAL Infect
1991 63,650 32 0.0503%
1992 65,634 35 0.0533%
1993 56,876 31 0.0545%
1994 70,897 17 0.0240%
1995 75,997 20 0.0263%
1996 7,5912 9 0.0119%
1997 79,291 11 0.0139%
1998 88,149 9 0.0124%
1999 97,864 2 0.0020%
2000 102,453 6 0.0058%
2001 108,351 4 0.0037%
2002 110,971 1 0.0009%
2003 108,883 1 0.0009%
2004 118,692 2 0.0017%
2005 121,813 0 0.0000%
2006 127,756 0 0.0000%
2007 128,912 2 0.0016%
2008 115,754 0 0.0000%
2009 95,494 0 0.0000%
2010 95,384 0 0.0000%
2011 86,903 0 0.0000%
2012 88,686 0 0.0000%
2013 77,001 0 0.0000%
2014 74,782 0 0.0000%
2015 73,739 4 0.0054%
2016 75,292 0 0.0000%

Last Updated: 2/01/2016

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2013 Kentucky Testing Summary

2016 Monthly Testing

MONTH
Total
Tests
Private Tests
Surveillance Tests
JAN
4,184
3895
289
FEB
4,827
4674
153
MAR
12,339
1286
153
APR
10,371
9992
379
MAY
6,665
6400
265
JUN
5,180
4942
238
JUL
7,277
7117
160
AUG*
6,340
6092
248
SEP**
6,928
6694
234
OCT
4,326
4001
325
NOV
4,257
4015
242
DEC
2,597
2413
184
TOTAL
75,291
72,241
2,870
* 1 Positive Horse through private testing
** 3 Positive horses identified (exposed to July Horse)
through epidemiology testing

 

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Equine Viral Arteritis

HISTORY
During the spring of 1984 a virus identified by the University of Kentucky's Department of Veterinary Science as Equine Arteritis Virus was threatening Kentucky's thoroughbred population. As a result of the continued spread of the virus amongst Central Kentucky's thoroughbred farms, all breeding of thoroughbred horses was ordered stopped during the early summer months by The Kentucky Department of Agriculture.

The Department of Agriculture, working cooperatively with the University of Kentucky's Department of Veterinary Science, worked throughout the fall and winter to determine the extent of the recent outbreak. Prior to the 1985 breeding season all thoroughbred stallions were tested under the supervision of the Department. All stallions found to be positive to the serology test were quarantined while additional testing was conducted to determine if they in fact were carrier's of the arteritis virus.

After a short delay, non-affected stallions were permitted to begin breeding in 1985. Stallions which were not vaccinated against the virus were monitored by serology testing every 14 days throughout the course of the breeding season to insure that the virus was not being spread. Stallions which were found to be shedding arteritis virus were permitted to return to breeding midway through the '85 breeding season. These stallions were heavily regulated by the Department of Agriculture to insure that they were bred only to qualified mares which were approved to be bred by the State Veterinarian's Office while following a stringent post breeding protocol consisting of isolation and quarantine.

Today there are no known thoroughbred shedding stallions standing at stud in Kentucky. The Department of Agriculture requires that all thoroughbred stallions standing at stud in Kentucky be vaccinated annually against Equine Arteritis Virus. Stallions which are standing their first season in Kentucky are required to be tested prior to vaccination in order to determine that they are not affected with the arteritis virus. As of today the only commercially approved vaccine for use is manufactured by Fort Dodge Laboratories and is called ARVAC?.

The Kentucky Department of Agriculture, working cooperatively with the Jockey Club maintains a stallion roster to insure that all stallions standing in Kentucky are properly vaccinated.
KY's EVA Regulation

Click for Statistics
Equine Viral Arteritis Thoroughbred Stallions
Standing at Stud in Kentucky
EVAVaccinations - Thoroughbred Stallion Roster
Last Updated 2/01/2017
Year
Standing
Year Standing

 

 

1990
1991
1992
1993
1994
1995
1996
1997
1998
1999
2000
2001
2002
2003
2004

521
491
489
441
393
399
390
422
425
435
404
403
373
354
333

2005
2006
2007
2008
2009
2010
2011
2012
2013
2014
2015
2016

345
356
337
340
326
301
260
242
239
252
244
250

   

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2013 Occurrences of Equine Herpes Virus Type-1
Kentucky's Perspective and Position Updated: March 7, 2013

Equine Herpes Virus Type 1 (EHV-1) is described to be a highly contagious pathogen that is ubiquitous in horse populations throughout the world. Infections in horses can result in a variety of ailments that include respiratory disease, abortions, neonatal deaths and the neurologic disease termed Equine Herpes Myeloencephalopathy (EHM). Recently, alerts of Equine Herpes Myeloencephalopathy being diagnosed in multiple states have been issued. States having cases of EHM diagnosed in recent months include California, Florida, Illinois, New Jersey, Tennessee and Utah. Horses of different breeds and representing vastly different disciplines and activity have been affected.

The apparent increased frequency of disease and severity of symptoms being seen has lead Kentucky State Veterinarian Robert Stout to conclude extra precaution needs to be initiated and implemented to help mitigate the associated risk. We are directing Kentucky facility managers and the managers of shows/exhibitions planned to be held in Kentucky to immediately review their biosecurity practices and if needed elevate their biosecurity plan to minimize opportunity of horses having direct or indirect contact with one another. Indirect contact would include common water and feed sources as well as shared equipment and common areas. The goal of a biosecurity plan is to prevent the transmission of infectious agents among individuals. The components of a successful program will include cooperation of management, facility layout, decontamination, and when applicable immunization. Each of these factors directly affects the success or failure of the program. A copy of the American Association of Equine Practitioners biosecurity guidelines and EHV resources can be found at www.aaep.org/ehv_resources.htm. Our office is happy to assist facilities, show management and event veterinarians in evaluating their individual plans and when a need is identified, assist in adapting the plans.

As an additional preventive measure, we encourage horsemen to consult their veterinarians and after evaluating their animal's vaccination status consider if there is need or benefit to stimulating an immune response by vaccinating against EHV-1. We acknowledge the available vaccines' labels make no claim to prevent neurologic disease; but based on our experience managing outbreaks of this disease, and in consultation with infectious disease experts and research scientist, we continue to be of the opinion the vaccine does have a meaningful level of efficacy and may aide in reducing the impact of a disease incident.

In response to the identified increased risk, we have and will continue to operate with elevated regulatory surveillance and equine health inspection activity at events in Kentucky. Exhibitors can expedite their passage through our inspection points by having their health documents organized and horses loaded in a manner that will allow visual inspection. In addition to the surveillance and inspection activity we will be working closely with show managers and veterinarians to insure immediate notification and quick response to any suspected communicable disease.